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xBoletus appendiculatus
Boletus appendiculatus
Agaricus bresadolanus
Agaricus bresadolanus
Melanophyllum haematospermum
Melanophyllum haematospermum
Cyathus olla
Cyathus olla
Helvella crispa
Helvella crispa
Phylloporia (Phellinus) ribis
Phylloporia (Phellinus) ribis
Geopora sumneriana
Geopora sumneriana
Amanita muscaria
Amanita muscaria
Coprinus picaceus
Coprinus picaceus
Calocybe gambosa
Calocybe gambosa
Limacella ochraceolutea
Limacella ochraceolutea
Volvariella pusilla
Volvariella pusilla
Taphrina alni
Taphrina alni
Cristulariella depraedens
Cristulariella depraedens
Geastrum triplex
Geastrum triplex
Geastrum fimbriatum
Geastrum fimbriatum
Volvariella surrects
Volvariella surrects
Ganoderma resinaceum
Ganoderma resinaceum
Stropharia aruginosa
Stropharia aruginosa
Stropharia aruginosa
Stropharia aruginosa
Rhodotus palmatus
Rhodotus palmatus
Amanita muscaria
Amanita muscaria
Armillaria gallica
Armillaria gallica
Gymnopilus penetrans
Gymnopilus penetrans
Lepiota felina
Lepiota felina
Scutellina sp.
Scutellina sp.
Amanita pantherina
Amanita pantherina
Fomes fomentarius
Fomes fomentarius
Hygrocybe cantharellus
Hygrocybe cantharellus
Hygrocybe psitticina
Hygrocybe psitticina
Odemansiella mucida
Oudemansiella mucida
Mycena pura
Mycena pura
Chlorociboria aeruginascens
Chlorociboria aeruginascens
Plicatura crispa
Plicatura crispa
Plicatura crispa
Plicatura crispa
Hygrocybe calyptriformis
Hygrocybe calyptriformis
Geastrum corollinum
Geastrum corollinum
Geastrum corollinum
Geastrum corollinum




Taphrina alni

Taphrina alni, Taphrina alni. Alder Tongue, an interesting fungal gall found recently (August 2012) on alder trees in the Lye Valley by Judy Webb. Growths emerge green, turn yellow then flame red and then go brown, red tongues very distinctive.



Taphrina alni     Photo: ©Judy Webb









Boletus appendiculatus

Boletus appendiculatus, pores bright lemon yellow, good for the pot but a rare species in the Oxford area.



Boletus appendiculatus     Photo: ©Alan Hills









Agaricus bresadolanus

Agaricus bresadolanus uncommon, looks like the common edible mushroom but is distinguished by prominent white branching rhizomorphs at the base of the stipe, Eynsham.



Agaricus bresadolanus    Photo: ©Max Peterson








Melanophyllum haematospermum

Melanophyllum haematospermum. This uncommon fungus is the only British fungus with red spores!



Melanophyllum haematospermum    Photo: ©Joanna Dodsworth










Cyathus olla

Cyathus olla, Birds nest fungus, very small, 1 cm diam, on bark chippings, Albert Park, Abingdon, late October.

Cyathus olla     Photo: ©Molly Dewey








Helvella crispa

Helvella crispa, White Saddle fungus, found growing through gravel in a driveway.

Helvella crispa     Photo: ©Molly Dewey








Phylloporia (Phellinus) ribis

Phylloporia (Phellinus) ribis, uncommon bracket fungus, base of old spindle tree on chalk grassland.

Phylloporia (Phellinus) ribis     Photo: ©Judy Webb












Geopora sumneriana

Geopora sumneriana, found by Judy Webb, 21 March 2012, poking out of soil on edge of footpath at junction of Girdlestone Road and Old Road in Headington nr Churchill hospital.

Geopora sumneriana     Photo: ©Judy Webb










Amantia muscaria

Amanita muscaria, common name Fly Agaric. Common under birch, poisonous and hallucinogenic. Kennington 2011.

Amantia muscaria     Photo: ©Molly Dewey








Coprinus picaceus

Coprinus picaceus, common name Magpie Inkcap. Found in leaf litter in woodland, Kennington, 2009.

Coprinus picaceus     Photo: ©Joyce Gibbard








Calocybe gambosa

Calocybe gambosa, St George's mushroom. Kennington in grass under ash and oak. Commonly found each year around St Georges Day, April 23.

Calocybe gambosa     Photo: ©Molly Dewey








Limacella ochraceolutea

Limacella ochraceolutea, an extremely slimy orange-capped toadstool discovered by Judy Webb in July in leaf litter on the edge of the fen at Cothill NNR (Ruskin Reserve). First record in Oxfordshire.

Limacella ochraceolutea     Photo: ©Judy Webb







Volvariella pusilla

Volvariella pusilla, a pretty little toadstool with gills that are initially white but turn shell pink when taken home. Note the volva at the base. Found by Richard Fortey, Blackhorse Fields September 2011.

Volvariella pusilla     Photo: ©Judy Webb







Cristulariella depraedens

Cristulariella depraedens, brown spots seen on sycamore leaves for the first time in many woods in Oxon in 2012 together with the familiar black spots of Rhytisma acerinum.

Cristulariella depraedens     Photo: ©Molley Dewey







Geastrum triplex

Geastrum triplex, The Collared Earth Star, found under Beech at Aston Rowant Foray, 7 October, 2012. Often, a layer of the exoperidium splits around the perimeter of the spore sac so that it appears to rest in a collar or saucer around the spore sac.

Geastrum triplex     Photo: ©Judy Webb









Geastrum fimbriatum

Geastrum fimbriatum, The Sessile Earth Star,found under Beech at Aston Rowant Foray 7 October, 2012.

Geastrum fimbriatum     Photo: ©Judy Webb












Volvariella surrects

Volvariella surrects, This very rare fungus was found growing on top of Clitocybe nebularis by Richard Fortey, late October 2012, near Lambridge Woods, Henley on Thames.

Volvariella surrects     Photo: ©Richard Fortey






Ganoderma resinaceum

Ganoderma resinaceum, A large (approx 40cm), relatively rare species of Ganoderma found at the base of a mature oak tree on property adjacent to Bagley Wood. Distinguished from the more common species, Ganoderma lucidum, by lack of a marked stem.

Ganoderma resinaceum     Photo: ©Molly Dewey






Stropharia aruginosa Stropharia aruginosa

Stropharia aruginosa, the Verdigris Agaric, found both at the Warburg Reserve, under Beech on October 26 and again in Bagley Wood under oak, Nov.17, 2013. Blue to blue-green flecked with white scales, poisonous. Photos:©Molly Dewey


Rhodotus palmatus

Rhodotus palmatus, sometimes called the Wrinkled Peach because of the obvious wrinkles and peach/apricot colour when young. Found at the Warburg Reserve, October 26, 2013 on Dead Elm wood.

Rhodotus palmatus     Photo: ©Molly Dewey






Caroline stitchwork

Amanita muscaria, design and stitchwork by Caroline Jackson-Houlston. A contribution to the patch work quilt made by members of Plant Life to foster interest in Wild Flowers and Fungi.

Amanita muscaria     Photo: ©Caroline Jackson-Houlston






Armillaria gallica

Armillaria gallica, the bulbous Honey fungus, darker and smaller than other species of Armillaria and distinguished by the bulbous base to the stipe. Uncommon in Britain. Found by Judy Webb, Nov 13, 2013, in Bagley Wood.

Armillaria gallica     Photo: ©Judy Webb











Gymnopilus penetrans

Gymnopilus penetrans, Common Rust Gill fungus, found by Judy Webb, Nov 13, 2013 in Bagley Wood on rotting logs and fallen branches under Pine.

Gymnopilus penetran     Photo: ©Judy Webb












Lepiota felina

Lepiota felina, Speckled Daperling. An uncommon, attractive little fungus, found in Bagley Wood, under conifers, by Judy Webb, November 13, 2013.

Lepiota felina     Photo: ©Judy Webb












Scutellina sp.

Scutellina sp. The Eyelash fungus, so called because of the hairs surrounding the cup of this little fungus which is an Ascomycete. Usually found on damp wood or damp soil. This one, was found by Judy Webb's son on the upper surface of the trunk of a fallen Ash tree in the garden of Molly Dewey, March 3, 2007.

Scutellina sp.     Photo: ©Judy Webb




Amanita pantherina

Amanita pantherina ( Panther cap) Found in mixed woodlands, dangerous-toxic but not usually fatal, Sodium hydroxide turns the cap yellow.

Amanita pantherina     Photo: ©John Woolliams







Fomes fomentarius

Fomes fomentarius (Hoof fungus or Tinder bracket) Associated with deciduous trees commonly on beech in S. England and Birch in Scotland. Underside cream with rounded pores.

Fomes fomentarius     Photo: ©John Woolliams






Hygrocybe cantharellus

Hygrocybe cantherellus (Goblet Waxcap) small, reddish or orange waxcap with dry scurfy cap, found in unimproved grassland.

Hygrocybe cantharellus     Photo: ©John Woolliams







Hygrocybe psitticina

Hygrocybe psitticina (Parrot waxcap) Extremely variable in colour but green tint almost always present. Widespread and common in unimproved grassland.

Hygrocybe psitticina     Photo: ©John Woolliams







Oudemansiella mucida

Oudemansiella mucida (Porcelain fungus) in clusters on dying broad leaf trees predominantly on Beech. White glistening, mucoid caps.

Oudemansiella mucida     Photo: ©John Woolliams







Mycena pura

Mycena pura (Lilac bonnet) variable in size and colour lilac to pink with strong smell of raddish. Widespread and common.

Mycena pura     Photo: ©John Woolliams







Chlorociboria aeruginascens

Chlorociboria aeruginascens (Green elf cup or greenwood) Generally found on fallen, rotten branches of wood of oak. This species contains a quinone pigment called xylindein, which gives infected wood a characteristic bluish-green stain, it is used in Tunbridge ware.

Chlorociboria aeruginascens     Photo: ©John Banham




Plicatura crispa Plicatura crispa

Plicatura crispa found by Richard Fortey in Harpsden Wood on fallen branch of Cherry, Nov 5 2016. Essentially a Scottish fungus, only once reported south of York.






Upper surface



From below


Plicatura crispa     Photo: ©Jackie Fortey










Hygrocybe calyptriformis

Hygrocybe calyptriformis (a.k.a. ballerina). A rare Hygrocybe (Wax cap) found by R.Fortey at the Maharajah's Well Stoke Row, mid November, 2016

Hygrocybe calyptriformis     Photo: ©Jackie Fortey







Geastrum corollinus Geastrum corollinus

Geastrum corollinus Small, rare (Red data listed species, new to Oxon) Earth Star known as the Weather Earthstar. It was found by Julia Huggins in a box grove (Buxus sempervirens) at Shirburn Hill on April 16 2016. It is closed when dry, when wet 6-10 star-lke rays of the outer layer uncurl and push against surrounding leaves raising the inner spore-filled sac above the surrounding debris.



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